Nintendo Famicom

Nintendo Famicom
Nintendo Famicom

Final Fantasy Xi: A Brief History

The Final Fantasy series is a superb set of games that have become an important part of video game history. Final Fantasy XI is an especially strong title. It is a terrific modern update on the series, advancing it and taking it into exciting new territory.

Final Fantasy XI is an outstanding entry in a series that is nearly twenty years old. The Final Fantasy series was created by the Japanese company Square Co. in 1987. At the time Square were in a difficult position, as they had focused on making games for the Nintendo Famicom Disk System and this format had become unpopular. The company were eager for success and saw great potential in the role-playing genre. Final Fantasy was their attempt to make a new kind of role-playing title.

Final Fantasy came out in Japan at the end of 1987. It was excellent, offering a fresh and original role-playing experience. Final Fantasy’s strength was that it had a strong narrative that ran throughout the game. This made it very compelling and helped it to capture people’s interest. It was an enormous success and launched what would become a hugely popular franchise. It would lead to Final Fantasy XI and beyond.

When Square made Final Fantasy, they looked at the role-playing genre and explored the possibilities of what it could do. Final Fantasy was innovative, and this sense of invention would become a major element of the series, continuing all the way through to Final Fantasy XI. The first sequel, Final Fantasy II, was equally creative, surprising people by coming up with a completely new plot and characters.

The Final Fantasy series flourished and a number of dazzling games followed. Final Fantasy IV was a gripping, brilliant game and became the second title in the series to be released in North America. Final Fantasy VI had an enthralling story that gave it serious emotion and depth. Final Fantasy X used voice acting and beautiful three-dimensional visuals to create its own game world. These were all strong titles and laid the way beautifully for Final Fantasy XI.

Final Fantasy XI has continued the sense of innovation that is expected of this series. A highly ambitious game, it saw the franchise move into the world of online gaming. Final Fantasy XI is a massively multi-player online role-playing game.  It is also unique as it is playable on both consoles and PCs, all of which connect to the same game servers. This has made it the first cross-platform title of its kind.

There was great curiosity about Final Fantasy XI before its release in 2002. Images and previews of the game captured people’s attention. A special bonus disk was included with the release of Final Fantasy X, containing a trailer for the game. Its creator Square Enix also held beta tests for the game to gather players’ feedback and improve it. This allowed them to handle any concerns that people had and fine-tune it.

Final Fantasy XI was launched in Japan on May 16 2002 for the Sony PlayStation 2. The PC release came on November 5th. It had its PC release in North America on October 28 2003, with the European release following in September 2004. The initial Japanese launch was a complicated affair, as the game required a hard drive for the PlayStation 2 console and stocks of these were limited at first. Square Enix responded well to any issues that developed, and also released a game patch to enhance it.

Square Enix adopted an interesting approach to the game, developing it and reworking it even after it had been released. The company has revised it since its launch and made it even better, adding in new areas and new content. This has enriched the Final Fantasy XI experience. There have been two expansions, Rise of the Zilart and Chains of Promathia, to complement the game. A third expansion, Treasures of Aht Urhgan, is planned for spring 2006.

Final Fantasy XI has established itself as a major presence in online gaming. It sold well, building up more than 500,000 subscribers by January 7 2004. There were almost a million game characters active within this time period. It was well received, enjoying many positive reviews from the game press. It was crucial in building up Square Enix’s PlayOnline service and more than fulfilled their hopes for the title.

Final Fantasy XI is a truly great game. It has combined the creativity and innovation that is the hallmark of Final Fantasy with a state of the art online gaming format. It is an amazing experience and has taken the series in a new direction. It will continue entertaining people for a long time to come.

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SNES to Famicom?

Last time I asked this question, I didn’t really put it clearly I guess

SNES (American Super Nintendo) and Super Famicom (Japanese Super Nintendo) are not compatible. That means Super Famicom games will not work for the Super Nintedo. I heard that there is a way to allow it to work. Can someone tell me how to make Super Famicom games work for the SNES. Experts on this stuff, it’s not because the game is not work, they are not compatible unless you do something certain, however, I’m not sure what you have to do.

How do I make the Japanese Super Nintendo game work for the American Super Nintendo game? Famicom = Family Computer by the way

Very simple you see, the matter is Super Famicom games work PERFECTLY on a Super Nintendo, there is only one thing to prevent them from working, and that is actually physically inserting the cartridge into the Super Nintendo.

You see what Nintendo of America essentially did was create two plastic tabs, of which North American releases of games have appropriate slots (check to back of a cart), thus they fit into the loader. If you open the door bay you should see where these are at. Since Japanese games did not have these slots, they could not be physically inserted.

Two ways to get around it. To state the obvious, remove the tabs inside the loading bay of the system itself and you got no problems.

Second is the solution that came around the import scene, a intermediate device that plugs into the Super Nintendos slot and then with another slot on top to accommodate any cartridge.

But you don’t have to buy a special “import device” (although they are likely dirt cheap these days), a simple Game Genie can do it. And no, it isn’t about codes, no codes needed, it is merely because the game genie does not contain slots for to prevent Japanese games from being inserted ontop of it.

I have one Import, FF5, which is forever attached to a Game Genie.

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